Wearable review: Withings Pulse Ox, WS-30 WiFi scale, and Blood Pressure Monitor

Due to the launch of the biosensors module for my company’s medical imaging and data solution a few days ago, the Withings company sent me a biosensor (wearable) Withings Pulse Ox, manometer BPM and WiFi WS-30 scale for testing and integration tests ahead of some national projects we are about to sign in London and Santiago de Chile.

All three came in luxury packaging, and were relatively easy to connect and set up, at least for a “tinkerer” (there are people who gets annoyed if I use “hacker” as a synonym, although it is) like me.

The WS-30 scale is connected via WiFi, and sends the weight and BMI, either to the “cloud” or to another application (data accessible via API) and synchronizes it with the phone, either Apple’s iOS or Android, as in my case, by its own application or connection with third-party applications.

scale

The BPM blood pressure cuff is one of those devices that doctors place around a patients’ arm and inflate to measure blood pressure. In this case it’s the same, but driven by a phone, and measurements are wirelessly synchronized as explained above in the case of  the scale, but there is also the option of using a USB cable.

esfigmomanómetro

Finally, the Pulse Ox is a “bracelet-type” or “clock” device showing (depending on configuration) with each press of its single button: day / time, blood oxygen level (SpO2) and pulse, quantity and quality of sleep, steps, distance and elevation. It’s really light and comfortable to wear, easy to use, and I like its design.

Pulse Ox

These are certainly excellent devices, and I really appreciate them opening access to the data, unlike others (like Basis).

dasboard

I shall not comment on the benefits and dangers of this “quantify-self” trend to quantify all personal activities (although in my case I do it for work and aim to provide data and monitoring to certain patients in a simple, integrated mode). What is certain is that with the “internet of things” (IoT) there is no escape from this trend of quantifying that some denounce as “reductionist” or “dehumanizing”, while others see as a panacea to solve all kinds of problems. I prefer to focus my efforts in trying to make sure that if it has to happen, it is an open, integrated, interoperable, and privacy-safeguarded accessible way. And that’s what I’m working on (or rather my great team of developers).

The market for these devices is growing at full speed, although they are not exactly cheap (yet). Each has advantages and disadvantages. From Intel to Apple through Nike and Samsung, many multinationals are betting that soon everyone will wear a device like these in one form or another, even in the fabric of their shirt. The last to arrive is the last one I expected, specially since they seem to have done it so well: Microsoft, with its “Band”, which not only provides connection from iOS devices, Android, or Windows Mobile of course, but also has advanced sensors like constant pulse reading or GPS.

MS Band

This is getting interesting!

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