Yesterday I went with my wife and son to visit the Victoria & Albert’s Museum exhibition You Say You Want a Revolution? Records and Rebels 1966-1970. The aim of the exhibition was quite clear: How have the finished and unfinished revolutions of the late 1960s changed the way we live today and think about the future? I was very much looking forward to visiting the exhibition. It is SO timely, and SO needed, I thought.
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Yesterday, after spending the day at a tradeshow in Düsseldorf, on my way by train to the hotel in Mülheim, I stopped in the town of Duisburg, which was on my way, because I heard they were setting up a Christmas market. The market was indeed being set up, but it was still closed, so I decided to go back to the station. To avoid the sprinkling rain I took the 901 tram at König-Heinrich Platz.
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On Thursday, coming back home from a meeting, I run into the Million Masks March. While I assume I agree with most of their anti-system protests (the truth is I did not bother to read them), I think their choice of Guy Fawkes as an “icon”, even if a graphical one as proposed by the comic/movie “V for Vendetta”, is a very stupid one. Just read about what that historical figure had in mind and judge for yourself.
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The absurdly convoluted visa policies of India, and the absurdly privatized process of obtaining it, have made me cancel a trip that was supposed to be a routine work day in Kalkata. It’s amazing that in the XXI century bureaucracy affects so many countries so much, and toy with people’s lives via ridiculous laws. The official information handled by my travel agency, one of the largest in the world, says that if I spend less than 24 hours in India I do not need visa.
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Last Tuesday, October 1, I attended a panel at the City University of New York Graduate Center, titled “Into Left Field: Progressive Media in the Age of Austerity“. The Graduate Center’s Peter Beinart (@PeterBeinart), senior political writer for the Daily Beast, discussed the health of progressive media with Katha Pollitt (@KathaPollitt), longtime columnist for The Nation; Joy-Ann Reid (@TheReidReport), managing editor of NBC’s TheGrio.com; and Nermeen Shaikh (@nermeendn), co-host of Democracy Now!
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On July 25 I was asked by someone at IBM to write an article about the use of the cloud in healthcare: I’d like to offer you the opportunity to author an article which we would look to promote across all of our social properties, other external communications as well as our paid media sponsorships, i.e. blogs. I was given suggestions on article length, topic, and keywords, but freedom to write whatever I wanted.
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In a single word: security. By now there is no doubt about the advantages of the cloud: easy collaboration, scalability, ubiquity, sync, cost savings (21% on average, according to AFCOM 2011, 40% according to our own customers), rapid deployment, etc. There is also no doubt about the need for a move to the cloud in healthcare: according to Enterprise Strategy Group, by 2015 an average of 665TB of data will be generated per hospital per year.
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Jorge Cortell

My blog in English

Serial entrepreneur (x8) and Art Curator - Founder & CEO, Kanteron Systems

London (UK)